One Down One Across II
One Down One Across II

Oil & Gesso on Canvas 10x10cms

One Down One Across III
One Down One Across III

Oil & Gesso on Canvas 10x10cms

One Down One Across I
One Down One Across I

Oil & Gesso on Canvas 10x10cms

This series of works explores the intersection where perspective and surface meet, where a painted image dissolves into painting as object.

Mine (Introduction)
Mine (Introduction)

Oil on Canvas 150x150cms

This series of works explores the act of improvisation and gesture within the history of painting. As a body of work these paintings allude to movements in music, instruments or voicings which combine to form a suite or sonata. Time is ever present in the work as is the notion of gesture as a singular action. These works address gesture as a canon or history of marks, a constantly evolving vernacular.

Masqualero
Masqualero

Oil & Coloured Gesso on Canvas 150x150cms

Directions
Directions

Oil & Coloured Gesso on Canvas 150x150cms

The Theme
The Theme

Oil & Coloured Gesso on Canvas 150x150cms

Earth
Earth

Gesso & Pigment on Canvas 77x92cms

Pressure
Pressure

Oil & Cracked Gesso on Canvas 150x120cms

The Enemy Within
The Enemy Within

Oil & Shovel on Canvas 150x150cms

D.H. Lawrence
D.H. Lawrence

Oil & Graphite on Board 55x45cms

This work uses the image of writer D.H. Lawrence to call forth a humanism in the wake of the industrial revolution. With the eyes averted and the pull of the wet paint from left to right, the figure in Lawrence #2 seems to drop back away from the viewer, allowing for a calm contemplation, unchallenged by the subject's gaze. Yet this synthetic wipe at the same time reminds us of the buzz of screen imagery, the manipulation of particles in constant flux. The abstract juxtaposition of the subject, its romanticization of modernist principles, and the noise of its post structural finish delivers us a paradoxical look on what it is to be human. The 'absurd' nature of the human condition caught between its fascination with the author and the distance forced between the subject (D.H. Lawrence) and the viewer

Hunger II
Hunger II

Oil & Graphite on Canvas 150x150cms

These works take Knut Hamsun’s novel 'Hunger' as their theme. A paradox is present on the surface of the canvas, the graphite beneath registers the human hand, the human scale which, is obliterated by the systematic pull of black pigment. The black though seems to tell us more about intent and conviction than does the old modernist notion of labour registered within the graphite.

Hunger I
Hunger I

Oil & Graphite on Canvas 150x150cms

Black Flag
Black Flag

Oil on Canvas 100x100cms

untitled
untitled

Oil & Rust on Etching Plate 15x10.5cms

untitled
untitled

Washing Powder on Steel 200x100cms

Work destroyed.

untitled
untitled

Oil on Steel 200x100cms

Work destroyed.

untitled
untitled

Oil on Steel 200x100cms

Work destroyed.

untitled
untitled

Oil on Steel 200x100cms

Work destroyed.

After Goya II
After Goya II

Oil on Canvas 100x100cms

The After Goya Series are a contemporary reworking of Fransisco Goya's Crucified Christ. By manipulating the image in such a way that the subject becomes its own image, quite distinct and separate from its source I have sought to secularise the heavily loaded, scared signifiers which are present in Goya's original work. In doing so I have opened up the image and fractured the work's ties to the originals style, period and context. Both subject and content now stand on equal terms with the medium itself, this could be contemporary man, timeless, new.

The Mercer Art Gallery Collection, UK.

After Goya I
After Goya I

Oil & Beeswax on Canvas 100x100cms

Private Collection, Spain.

Robert Manners
Robert Manners

Oil on Board 55x50cms

‘Extracting components from Hennell’s photographs of reconstructive surgery to WW1 soldiers to Van Dyck, Reynolds and Tonks Gurrey constructs faces that comprise the elegance of a Velazquez, with the painterly deftness of a Saville. This ‘piecing together’ of images from times past not only accentuates the images' nostalgic selves but also hints at another form of grafting; the renovating of the body unnecessarily, with today’s narcissistic onslaught of Botox and Face-Lifting. By distorting his victims’ deformities to a heightened level; the spectator is left even more chilled in the acknowledgement of society’s vanity, as we each meddle with our own physical attributes in a desire to sculpt a vision of perfect beauty’ (Madder139 press release.)

Private Collection, UK.

Stare
Stare

Oil on Board 30x30cms

Private Collection, UK.

Reverse
Reverse

Oil on Card 15x10.5cms

Private Collection, UK.

Hyphen
Hyphen

Oil on Board 30x30cms

Private Collection, UK.

Head
Head

Oil on Board 30x30cms

‘Gurrey paints in an androgynous manner, illustrating the dichotomy of the self by often segregating his subjects in two, highlighting the concept of the ‘split self’ and the notion of many different personalities in one face. Goya is also renowned for this, most noticeably in ‘Two Old Men, 1821-23’, where Goya himself is depicted as an ageing man, confronted by a dark demon (his alto ego) whispering in his ear. The dichotomy is further exacerbated in the ageing man’s face where the eyes are visibly different, the right eye gawking out in a challenging manner, glaring directly upon the viewer, while the left cowers evasively in the clinical, vacant shade.’ (Madder139 press release)

Private Collection, USA.

Girl
Girl

Oil on Board 30x30cms

Private Collection, USA.

Cornelis van der Geest
Cornelis van der Geest

Oil on Card 15x10.5cms

Eye
Eye

Oil on Board 55x50cms

‘He mainly paints portraits, injured, tormented and tortured faces. These bruised faces, ravaged by war or accident, show injuries that leave no room for indifference: broken jaws or noses, black eyes, swollen mouths, scalped heads... Philip Gurrey's artworks resemble a battlefield, whose victims nonetheless keep an eye open or half-smile to show that they are still alive. Philip Gurrey's influences are numerous: from photographs of Second World War victims by Percy Hennell to war paintings by Otto Dix and on through works by Francisco Goya who un-hesitantly depicted deformed victims and executioners. Philip Gurrey's paintings can be defined by a window upon the soul, a window upon unconscious injuries, buried deep down inside but which, underlying, can resurface at any time. The artist shows scars which are as much the materialisation of physical wounds as the “stigmata” of a psychological trauma.’ (Fondation Francè press release)

Fondation Francès Collection, France.

Cardinal Infante
Cardinal Infante

Oil on Board 30x30cms

Private Collection, UK.

One Down One Across II
One Down One Across III
One Down One Across I
Mine (Introduction)
Masqualero
Directions
The Theme
Earth
Pressure
The Enemy Within
D.H. Lawrence
Hunger II
Hunger I
Black Flag
untitled
untitled
untitled
untitled
untitled
After Goya II
After Goya I
Robert Manners
Stare
Reverse
Hyphen
Head
Girl
Cornelis van der Geest
Eye
Cardinal Infante
One Down One Across II

Oil & Gesso on Canvas 10x10cms

One Down One Across III

Oil & Gesso on Canvas 10x10cms

One Down One Across I

Oil & Gesso on Canvas 10x10cms

This series of works explores the intersection where perspective and surface meet, where a painted image dissolves into painting as object.

Mine (Introduction)

Oil on Canvas 150x150cms

This series of works explores the act of improvisation and gesture within the history of painting. As a body of work these paintings allude to movements in music, instruments or voicings which combine to form a suite or sonata. Time is ever present in the work as is the notion of gesture as a singular action. These works address gesture as a canon or history of marks, a constantly evolving vernacular.

Masqualero

Oil & Coloured Gesso on Canvas 150x150cms

Directions

Oil & Coloured Gesso on Canvas 150x150cms

The Theme

Oil & Coloured Gesso on Canvas 150x150cms

Earth

Gesso & Pigment on Canvas 77x92cms

Pressure

Oil & Cracked Gesso on Canvas 150x120cms

The Enemy Within

Oil & Shovel on Canvas 150x150cms

D.H. Lawrence

Oil & Graphite on Board 55x45cms

This work uses the image of writer D.H. Lawrence to call forth a humanism in the wake of the industrial revolution. With the eyes averted and the pull of the wet paint from left to right, the figure in Lawrence #2 seems to drop back away from the viewer, allowing for a calm contemplation, unchallenged by the subject's gaze. Yet this synthetic wipe at the same time reminds us of the buzz of screen imagery, the manipulation of particles in constant flux. The abstract juxtaposition of the subject, its romanticization of modernist principles, and the noise of its post structural finish delivers us a paradoxical look on what it is to be human. The 'absurd' nature of the human condition caught between its fascination with the author and the distance forced between the subject (D.H. Lawrence) and the viewer

Hunger II

Oil & Graphite on Canvas 150x150cms

These works take Knut Hamsun’s novel 'Hunger' as their theme. A paradox is present on the surface of the canvas, the graphite beneath registers the human hand, the human scale which, is obliterated by the systematic pull of black pigment. The black though seems to tell us more about intent and conviction than does the old modernist notion of labour registered within the graphite.

Hunger I

Oil & Graphite on Canvas 150x150cms

Black Flag

Oil on Canvas 100x100cms

untitled

Oil & Rust on Etching Plate 15x10.5cms

untitled

Washing Powder on Steel 200x100cms

Work destroyed.

untitled

Oil on Steel 200x100cms

Work destroyed.

untitled

Oil on Steel 200x100cms

Work destroyed.

untitled

Oil on Steel 200x100cms

Work destroyed.

After Goya II

Oil on Canvas 100x100cms

The After Goya Series are a contemporary reworking of Fransisco Goya's Crucified Christ. By manipulating the image in such a way that the subject becomes its own image, quite distinct and separate from its source I have sought to secularise the heavily loaded, scared signifiers which are present in Goya's original work. In doing so I have opened up the image and fractured the work's ties to the originals style, period and context. Both subject and content now stand on equal terms with the medium itself, this could be contemporary man, timeless, new.

The Mercer Art Gallery Collection, UK.

After Goya I

Oil & Beeswax on Canvas 100x100cms

Private Collection, Spain.

Robert Manners

Oil on Board 55x50cms

‘Extracting components from Hennell’s photographs of reconstructive surgery to WW1 soldiers to Van Dyck, Reynolds and Tonks Gurrey constructs faces that comprise the elegance of a Velazquez, with the painterly deftness of a Saville. This ‘piecing together’ of images from times past not only accentuates the images' nostalgic selves but also hints at another form of grafting; the renovating of the body unnecessarily, with today’s narcissistic onslaught of Botox and Face-Lifting. By distorting his victims’ deformities to a heightened level; the spectator is left even more chilled in the acknowledgement of society’s vanity, as we each meddle with our own physical attributes in a desire to sculpt a vision of perfect beauty’ (Madder139 press release.)

Private Collection, UK.

Stare

Oil on Board 30x30cms

Private Collection, UK.

Reverse

Oil on Card 15x10.5cms

Private Collection, UK.

Hyphen

Oil on Board 30x30cms

Private Collection, UK.

Head

Oil on Board 30x30cms

‘Gurrey paints in an androgynous manner, illustrating the dichotomy of the self by often segregating his subjects in two, highlighting the concept of the ‘split self’ and the notion of many different personalities in one face. Goya is also renowned for this, most noticeably in ‘Two Old Men, 1821-23’, where Goya himself is depicted as an ageing man, confronted by a dark demon (his alto ego) whispering in his ear. The dichotomy is further exacerbated in the ageing man’s face where the eyes are visibly different, the right eye gawking out in a challenging manner, glaring directly upon the viewer, while the left cowers evasively in the clinical, vacant shade.’ (Madder139 press release)

Private Collection, USA.

Girl

Oil on Board 30x30cms

Private Collection, USA.

Cornelis van der Geest

Oil on Card 15x10.5cms

Eye

Oil on Board 55x50cms

‘He mainly paints portraits, injured, tormented and tortured faces. These bruised faces, ravaged by war or accident, show injuries that leave no room for indifference: broken jaws or noses, black eyes, swollen mouths, scalped heads... Philip Gurrey's artworks resemble a battlefield, whose victims nonetheless keep an eye open or half-smile to show that they are still alive. Philip Gurrey's influences are numerous: from photographs of Second World War victims by Percy Hennell to war paintings by Otto Dix and on through works by Francisco Goya who un-hesitantly depicted deformed victims and executioners. Philip Gurrey's paintings can be defined by a window upon the soul, a window upon unconscious injuries, buried deep down inside but which, underlying, can resurface at any time. The artist shows scars which are as much the materialisation of physical wounds as the “stigmata” of a psychological trauma.’ (Fondation Francè press release)

Fondation Francès Collection, France.

Cardinal Infante

Oil on Board 30x30cms

Private Collection, UK.

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